Germany 101: The Hoff

All Germans are born with an inner desire. An unquenchable thirst. A yearning for something. That desire, that thirst, that yearning are for none other than David Hasselhoff aka The Hoff. However, due to some unfathomable reason, whenever you ask Germans this, they’ll deny it to their core.

The Hoff has been credited with many things in his life, such as unbridled manliness and looks so stunning they’ll bring tears to your eyes.

Who could blame the Germans for falling in love with this handsome devil?

Who could blame the Germans for falling in love with this handsome devil?

But perhaps his greatest claim to fame is bringing down the Berlin Wall – single-handedly, mind you – in 1989.

After the Second World War, Germany was divided between the Communist East Germany and Capitalist West Germany. The Berlin Wall – meant to divide the great city – became a symbol of the struggle of the German people. But on New Year’s Eve 1989 the fate of the East Germans was to change forever. David Hasselhoff got on stage during a concert near the Berlin Wall and performed his then No.1 hit single “Looking for Freedom” to cheers and applause from the crowd.

But unbeknownst to The Hoff and the crowd in West Berlin, the East Berliners heard it too. And even though they spoke barely any English, the desire for freedom burned in their hearts upon hearing this song. This event brought down the Berlin Wall that same year and led to German Reunification a year later.

The Hoff’s contributions were forgotten in the media frenzy over the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe which he triggered through his music. But I honor him for it and so do others. For some reason though, if you ask Germans they’ll just roll their eyes and tell you that for the ten thousandth time, they do not like The Hoff nor do they refer to him by that name. Jeez, I wonder why that is.

P.S: If you have a yearning for more from The Hoff, check out “Hooked on a Feeling”.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Germany 101: The Hoff

  1. Pingback: Germans and their Stereotypes | A Pakistani in the Bundesrepublik

  2. Pingback: 25 Years Since the Fall of the Wall: A Pakistani’s Perspective | A Pakistani in the Bundesrepublik

  3. Pingback: How the Germans Celebrate New Year | A Pakistani in the Bundesrepublik

  4. Pingback: States of Germany: Berlin | A Pakistani in the Bundesrepublik

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s